Cost of climbing Kilimanjaro rises due to VAT

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Cost of climbing Kilimanjaro rises due to VAT

July 6th, 2016|News Bulletins|

On 1 July 2016 the Tanzanian government went ahead with its long-mooted proposal to raise the VAT on park fees.

This, of course, has meant a large increase in the cost of climbing Kilimanjaro, as well as visiting the famous national parks (Serengeti, Ngorongoro) in the country.

Specifically, since 1 July 2016 the park fees for all national parks (Serengeti, Lake Manyara, Tarangire, Kilimanjaro, Ruaha etc.) have been subjected to a 18% VAT increase.

In addition, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCAA) has increased the entrance fees from US$50 to US$60 for adults and from US$10 to US$20 for children below the age of 16 years. The campsite fees have also been increased from US$30 to US$40 for adults and from US$10 to US$20 for children below the age of 16 years. Furthermore, the fee for a Ngorongoro Crater drive has risen from US$200 to US$250 per vehicle. Lastly, 18% VAT will also be enforced on those already increased fees.

The tour operators are currently looking at ways of absorbing these large increases while limiting the impact on those already booked with them. They have reacted in various ways, with some companies saying that they will absorb all the costs (ie the price you booked is the price you pay), either with no conditions or perhaps providing you pay in full before the end of a certain time period. Those already booked on a Kili climb or safari will need to contact their tour operator to find out if their price has been affected.

About the Author:

I am a little obsessed with Mount Kilimanjaro. Since writing the first edition of the Kilimanjaro guide in 2001 I have climbed the mountain more than 30 times and occasionally leads treks up the mountain myself. And when I'm not in Tanzania researaching for the next edition of the guide (the fifth edition was published in 2018), I can be found living near Hastings, England, updating this website (which was first published in 2006), writing about the national trails of England, answering Kili-related emails and putting on weight. Friends describe me as living proof that virtually anybody can climb Kilimanjaro.