Tanzanian visas for your Kilimanjaro trek

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Tanzanian visas for your Kilimanjaro trek

February 5th, 2016|Advice|

It’s a question that we still get asked a lot: I am climbing Kilimanjaro, so do I need a visa for Tanzania? And if so, how do I get one?

The simple answer to the first question is: yes, very probably. There are a few countries who DON’T REQUIRE A VISA. The list looks long but the countries on it are, on the whole, rather small. This list also consists largely (but not exclusively) of those countries that are Tanzania’s immediate or near neighbours.

THESE ARE THE COUNTRIES THAT DO NOT REQUIRE A VISA FOR TANZANIA:
Barbados, Botswana, Gambia, Ghana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Malaysia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Uganda, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE, THEREFORE, ARE REQUIRED TO GET A VISA FOR TANZANIA.

However, FOR MOST PEOPLE, THE SIMPLEST, QUICKEST WAY OF GETTING A VISA IS TO PICK ONE UP FROM THE AIRPORT. The procedure is painless. No photos are required. It takes about two minutes. It costs US$50 (although US and Irish citizens have to pay US$100 – which makes you wonder what they’ve done to upset the Tanzanians).

UK citizens, Canadians, Americans, Europeans, Australians and New Zealanders can all pick up their Tanzanian visa this way.

Finally, there are those for whom the procedure is not so easy. For nationalities of these countries, they will have to secure a visa in advance: Afghanistan, Azerbaijan
Bangladesh, Chad, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Palestine, Senegal, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Sri Lanka, Refugees and Stateless individuals.

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About the Author:

I am a little obsessed with Mount Kilimanjaro. Since writing the first edition of the Kilimanjaro guide in 2001 I have climbed the mountain more than 30 times and occasionally leads treks up the mountain myself. And when I'm not in Tanzania researaching for the next edition of the guide (the fifth edition was published in 2018), I can be found living near Hastings, England, updating this website (which was first published in 2006), writing about the national trails of England, answering Kili-related emails and putting on weight.Friends describe me as living proof that virtually anybody can climb Kilimanjaro.